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Mobile Device Forensic Collections

Mobile devices are everywhere. Within the last decade or so, smart phones have become not only a staple in our society, but arguably a necessity. There are two major players in the smartphone game, Android and Apple. Android devices make up the majority share of the smartphone market followed by Apple. There are others out there, like Windows OS phones and Blackberry, but they make up an incredibly small amount of the total smartphones.

Forensic Tools used for mobile device collections include Cellebrite, Encase, Axiom, and Oxygen. Preserving data from a mobile device can be much different than from a computer, and forensic software and hardware companies, like Cellebrite, specialize in creating tools for mobile device forensic collections and analysis.

There are a few different types of collections you can perform on mobile devices. Physical collections are bit-by-bit preservations of mobile devices, including the unused space. Logical collections preserve the user data only and not the free space of the phone. FileSystem collections preserve just the file system, which is very similar to the Logical collection, but could possibly pull some different data. The last resort in mobile device collections would be a manual collection. This is often used when a forensic tool can’t gain access to the device due to age or operating system restrictions. A manual collection consists of going through the phone manually and literally taking pictures of each screen. Not very efficient, but it’s a last resort option.

The type of data you can pull from a mobile device can be incredibly beneficial to a case. Some of the most sought-after data sets include messages, call logs, contacts, and photos, but there are many other pieces of information that can be discovered within a smartphone, including location data, calendar events, notes, website/application credentials, and many other useful bits of data. As such, mobile device forensic collections are becoming a staple in litigation discovery.  To learn more about how Lexbe can assist with your next Mobile Device Forensic Collection, contact sales@lexbe.com.

Lexbe Releases Updated LEP User Manual

An updated LEP User Manual is now available!  Click here to download your copy.

New Document Compare Feature!

LEP has added a new built-in feature on the Doc tab of the Doc Viewer allowing a user to compare two documents within a case. This can be extremely helpful when reviewing email chains and near duplicate documents. The new compare feature can display the documents side by side or line by line while highlighting all the differences. For more information, see tech note here.

LEP Supports Google Chrome MS Office Native Doc Viewer

Upon ingestion, LEP will attempt to process and convert compatible files to PDF for ease of review and will maintain and make available for download the native file in the Originals tab of the LEP Doc Viewer. When native review is preferred, Lexbe recommends a Google Chrome add-on that populates the LEP Doc Viewer Originals tab with a native viewer that can open MS Office documents. This is particularly helpful when needing to review Excel and PowerPoint files. The viewer will display these files as they would appear in their native program. For Excel files, this includes multiple sheets and for Powerpoint files this includes the presentation layout with comments and/or notes. There are many advantages to using the Google Chrome MS Office native doc viewer add on: speeds review in native format without having to download file, includes read-only native program functionality and navigation, provides option to download native file directly, contains tab views supported for Excel spreadsheets, and is offered directly by Google in the Chrome browser (compliance standards upheld). This add-on is supported for Google Chrome on Windows and MAC. For more information, see help page here

Legal Depts are increasingly Relying on AI in eDiscovery

The 12th annual Law Department Operations (LDO) survey found that effective use of technology in law departments has been slow to accelerate. Artificial intelligence has been wildly growing among several markets, but is just beginning to saturate the legal market–however, it is expected to continue. In general, AI has the potential to introduce new sources of growth, changing how work is done and reinforcing the role of people to drive growth in business. As Reese Arrowsmith, vice president, head of legal operations for Campbell Soup Co. states, “I do see AI and other technology advances having an impact on the way lawyers work. New technology will augment ways of working and may impact who completes legal work. I also see the legal industry utilizing data analytics to make decisions and to predict outcomes.”

One survey revealed that nearly half of those asked, said their law department does not use AI at all.  And, when law departments do use AI, it is most likely for e-discovery and document review. Twenty-seven percent of respondents sometimes use it for these areas, and 7% always use it.

To download the full report, click here

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